Electrolytes in energy gels

e-Gel is the only "electrolyte" energy gel

Every pack of e-Gel has 230 mg of sodium and 85 mg of potassium, that’s about 4 times what you get with most other gels.

why is this important?
SHORT ANSWER
Electrolytes are critical to maintain hydration and avoid cramping and injuries.
COMPLETE ANSWER

Energy gels have to be taken with water in order to be properly and rapidly absorbed (via osmosis). If you try to use a sports drink with your gel in order to get your electrolytes, it’s a recipe for disaster. The combined solution of the sports drink and the gel in your gut will be too concentrated (hypertonic), thus not allowing it to be rapidly absorbed. The result can be stomach discomfort, gas or worse. With other gels, the way to get your electrolytes is with some sort of electrolyte supplement. But this is one more thing to buy and one more thing to figure out how and how often to use. It doesn’t have to be that way.

Since energy gels are absorbed via osmosis, water is the transport vehicle that carries the gel into your cellular system. And we know how much water travels with the gel. Taking this into account, we have designed e-Gel to provide 500 mg of sodium and 200 mg of potassium per liter of absorbed fluid, which meets the recommendations of the American College of Sports Medicine for electrolyte replacement.

e-Gel has been doing this since 2001, and this is where the name e-Gel came from – it has all of the electrolytes and the energy you need, right in the gel. Just use e-Gel and water, it’s that easy.

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