EFS Liquid Shot vs e-Gel Energy Gel Comparison

The biggest difference between EFS Liquid Shot Energy Gel and e-Gel is that EFS uses 50% simple sugars while e-Gel uses more complex carbs than any other gel (and very little sugar). Below we discuss in detail why complex cabs allow you to uptake significantly more energy compared to using sugars. e-Gel also has 50% more sodium to help to maintain hydration and avoid cramping and injuries. And e-Gel has antioxidants not found in EFS gel that reduces tissue damage and soreness and speed the recovery time. Read on for the complete comparison.

calories

e-Gel

150

EFS Gel

150

EFS Liquid Shot is packaged in a 400 calorie flask, so for the purposes of this comparison we are comparing 150 calories of e-Gel to 150 calories of EFS.

complex carbs

e-Gel

30 g

EFS Gel

18 g

e-Gel has more complex carbs than any other energy gel and this is critical because your body can uptake more energy when you use complex carbs instead of simple sugars.

How is this possible?

Read on (or watch this video)

The carbs/energy in an energy gel are transported into your cellular system through osmosis. If you recall learning about osmosis in science class, it’s the way a fluid crosses a membrane. In order for the fluid to cross, it has to be an equal or lower concentration than the fluid on the other side of the membrane. In this case you’re trying to get the gel across your cellular membrane so you can use the energy. Gels by themselves are extremely concentrated (hypertonic), that’s why you need to use water with gel so that you can lower the concentration until it becomes isotonic (the same concentration as your cellular fluids). When you do, the gel and water get absorbed – osmosis!!

What’s interesting is that the concentration of a fluid (also called the osmolality) is largely dependent on the NUMBER of particles in the fluid, and less dependent on the size of the particles. Complex carbs by definition have a larger molecular structure than simple sugars, basically they have more glucose molecules stuck together. But remember, it’s the number of particles, not the size that matters most. What that means is that at the point of absorption (isotonic), a fluid with complex carbs can transport nearly twice as much energy into the cellular system compared to one with simple sugars.

This isn’t something that we’ve invented here a Crank Sports, it’s proven science. Many energy gels (including e-Gel) use at least some maltodextrin for this reason. Maltodextrin is a complex carbohydrate with an extremely large molecular structure. Where e-Gel sets itself apart from other products is that we use much more complex carb and less sugar. This allows you to get more energy when you use e-Gel compared to our competitors. Why do other companies use so much sugar? Simple, because it’s sweet and inexpensive, and sweet things sell. So if you want to sell a lot of something you make it sweet. But if you want to make the best PERFORMING product you use complex carbs.

sugar

e-Gel

18%

EFS Gel

50%

By providing lower sugar and more complex carbs instead, e-Gel is able to provide significantly more total energy uptake. See our complex carb discussion for complete details.

carb sources

e-Gel

Maltodextrin
Fructose

EFS Gel

Unspecified
Dextrose
Sucrose

e-Gel uses maltodextrin which is the preferred complex carbohydrate for endurance athletes. EFS Liquid Shot says it contains “complex carbohydrates” but they don’t specify the source.

EFS also uses Dextrose and Sucrose which are both simple sugars that in our opinion shouldn’t be in the product.

Instead, e-Gel uses fructose because it allows for additional energy uptake that you do not get from gels that don’t use it, read why

sodium

e-Gel

230 mg

EFS Gel

150 mg

e-Gel is the only energy gel to provide complete electrolyte replacement in the gel – where it should be! The most important electrolyte that you need to replenish is sodium to help you maintain hydration and to avoid cramping and injuries.

e-Gel contains 50% more sodium than EFS Liquid Shot and is designed to meet the American College of Sports Medicine’s recommendations for sodium replacement.

For a more detailed discussion of why it’s important to have this level of electrolytes in the gel instead of getting your electrolytes some other way:

read details

potassium

e-Gel

85 mg

EFS Gel

105 mg

Potassium is the other electrolyte that is important to replace during your training and competition, along with sodium. The level of potassium in e-Gel is designed to meet the American College of Sports Medicine’s recommendation for replacement during athletic activity. See the sodium discussion for additional details.

amino acids

e-Gel

Histidine, Leucine, Valine, Isoleucine

EFS Gel

Leucine, Valine, Isoleucine

e-Gel provides a blend of 4 important amino acids. Amino acids help to reduce lactic acid build up, reduce soreness, maintain muscle protein and aid in quicker recovery.

antioxidants

e-Gel

vitamin C 120%
vitamin E 120%​

EFS Gel

none

Antioxidant vitamins C and E help protect against tissue damage, reduce soreness and aid in the recovery process.

EFS Liquid SHOT does not include these antioxidants.

citrates

e-Gel

Sodium Citrate, Potassium Citrate and Citric Acid

EFS Gel

Citric Acid

Citrates assist in the carbohydrate to energy conversion process as well as slow the build up of lactic acid in your muscles.

ready to try e-Gel?

we guarantee you'll love it!​

facebook-customer-reviews

Keith Castleton

"Figuring out how to stay hydrated, not get upset stomach and prevent muscle cramps during long runs and races has been one of my biggest challenges. In the past my muscles would ache and twitch and cause me a lot of pain after long runs. I came across e-Gel energy gels this summer used them during the Top Of Utah Marathon, took 17 minutes off my previous marathon PR and easily qualified for Boston." ...
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Maricopa, Arizona
Sport: Running

Jeff Rommel

"I broke the golden rule and tried e-Gel for the first time on race day. I ran the Houston Marathon and it was a great experience - no stomach issues and no muscle cramping. Water in my bottle and an e-Gel every hour got me through the race. I'm not the fastest runner, but I set a PR!" ...
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Houston, Texas
Sport: Running

Adam Lecompte

"This is by far the best energy gel product on the market, and I have been through them all. I have had nothing but positive training and racing experiences with this product. I trained on and used e-Gel in a half half marathon and busted a 1:32.44! My personal best of 5 half marathons. The sustained energy is incredible! I absolutely love this product." ...
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Houma, Louisiana
Sport: Running and Triathlon

Shawn Smith

"At the USA Cycling Marathon Championships it was a 58 mile course and temps around 80-84. ... I raced to a 3rd place on only 2 bottles of e-Fuel and 2 e-Gels. No way around it. This product works and is fueling you can trust." ...
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Gainesville , Florida
Sport: Cycling

Vicki Griffin

"I am an Ironman distance, age grouper triathlete trying to qualify for Kona. Nutrition has always been a struggle... stomach issues, etc.... I used e-Fuel and e-Gel on my last 70.3, had no stomach issues, and won my age group." ...
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Leawood, Kansas
Sport: Triathlon

Kathy Murgas

"A friend recommended e-Gel years ago. I tried it, loved it, and 65 marathons (including 1 in each of the 50 states), I am still using it. I've changed the way I train, the shoes and wear, the clothes I wear, but never the gel I use." ...
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Dallas, Texas
Sport: Running & Cycling

NOTE: All EFS Liquid Shot energy Gel nutrition values shown are for Vanilla flavor as of April 2021, other flavors may vary. e-Gel nutrition values are the same for all flavors, read why

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